1 inch Hexagons 90° (POTC)

(7 customer reviews)

US$30.00

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Print on fabric for a replica of Patchwork of the Crosses (POTC) for better results than with hexagon templates.

Sew by hand with a running stitch or by machine, or both (recommended) or print templates for English Paper Piecing. Includes bonus shapes.

ISBN: 978-0-9810994-9-1 SKU: 90HEX1 Listed under: , ,

Description

Print 1 inch Hexagons 90° (POTC) on fabric for Patchwork of the Crosses in the original size.

See the 3 Videos on the Lucy Boston page for information about using templates, fussy cutting and hybrid piecing. The info in these three short videos applies to any design!

This is the original size in Lucy Boston Patchwork of the Crosses (optional book) which complements this download.

PDF DOWNLOAD – SHAPES 37.5 MB + HEXAGON QUILT DESIGN BOOK
System Requirements – Windows or Mac with Adobe Reader (not a phone or tablet) and any ordinary color Inkjet printer or all-in-one.

Print shapes on fabric with any ordinary Inkjet printer. Sew by hand or by machine or combine both in a hybrid.

1 inch Hexagons 90° (POTC)
POTC blocks are made with only one shape—the hexagon—and the blocks are linked with squares

1 inch Hexagons 90° (POTC) for edges
These unusual shapes are used for a straight edge on the quilt.

Bonus Shapes for Patchwork of the Crosses
These bonus shapes give you even more design options.

Features of the 1 inch Hexagons 90° (POTC) Shape Collection (PDF)

  • shapes with seam allowances to print on fabric (notice the precision corners and matching marks!)
  • diagrams showing how much fabric you need
  • shapes without seam allowances to print on paper (just in case you want templates)

POTC by Joan in Australia

See many more gorgeous POTC blocks on Pinterest too!

& More Good Things about 1 inch Hexagons 90° (POTC)

  • use a rotary cutter or scissors
  • more accurate than using templates (see the video, link above)
  • perfect for hybrid piecing (see the video, tab, link above)
  • notes about fussy cutting (see the video, link above!)
  • many extra shapes to expand your design options
  • a choice of layouts for different straight grain
  • shapes fit on Jelly Rolls and small scraps
  • complimentary Hexagon Quilt Design Book (PDF, 70 pages)

When you buy this shape collection, I manually add the Hexagon Quilt Design Book as soon as I see your order, so you can download it too. The design book focuses on 60° hexagons but the sewing and pressing instructions also apply to these shapes. (70 pages) You might want to get it first.

There is an optional companion book Lucy Boston Patchwork of the Crosses with wonderful photographs of the original quilt, including a large centerfold.

Print hexagons on fabric instead of using templates

Love the lines. Quilt more!

Special Features

Quilters love fussy cutting with Inklingo! (Video at Lucy Boston)

Choice of Methods – Hand or Machine

There are also 8 Good Ways to use Inklingo for EPP described in an article on Quilting Hub.

  1. Print paper templates.
    Paper pieces to print for templates with or without seam allowances.
  2. Print and cut the fabric.
    Print one fabric, layer with unprinted fabric and rotary cut several layers at a time. Choice of layouts!
  3. Fussy cut the fabric.
    TWO methods! Traditional and No Waste Fussy Cutting
  4. Preview fabric with window templates.
  5. Decide how much fabric to buy.
    Illustrations show at a glance how much fabric you need!
    That information alone is worth the price of a shape collection.
  6. Rescue an English Paper Piecing UFO.
    English Paper Piecing Rescue (free PDF) will help you make the switch. This is one of the most popular pages on the website.
  7. Create original  designs.
    You can never have too many designs!
  8. Learn from Inklingo support and tutorials.
    Just one example: There is no charge for the Hexagon Quilt Design Book ($20 value, PDF download) when you buy any hexagons to print on fabric/paper.

Lucy Boston sewed all of her quilts with templates and the method known as English Paper Piecing (EPP).  Get better results faster with Inklingo!

With Inklingo, these designs are faster and easier and more precise. Print the shapes on fabric and sew with a running stitch by hand or sew by machine, or a combination of both, as described in the Hybrid Piecing Video. If you sew with a running stitch, it is more portable, easier to prepare (no templates, no basting), and faster to sew.

There are also 8 Good Ways to use Inklingo for EPP described in an article on Quilting Hub.

  1. Print paper templates.
    Paper pieces to print for templates with or without seam allowances.
  2. Print and cut the fabric.
    Print one fabric, layer with unprinted fabric and rotary cut several layers at a time. Choice of layouts!
  3. Fussy cut the fabric.
    TWO methods! Traditional and No Waste Fussy Cutting
  4. Preview fabric with window templates.
  5. Decide how much fabric to buy.
    Illustrations show at a glance how much fabric you need!
    That information alone is worth the price of a shape collection.
  6. Rescue an English Paper Piecing UFO.
    English Paper Piecing Rescue (free PDF) will help you make the switch. This is one of the most popular pages on the website.
  7. Create original  designs.
    You can never have too many designs!
  8. Learn from Inklingo support and tutorials.
    Just one example: There is no charge for the Hexagon Quilt Design Book ($20 value, PDF download) when you buy any hexagons to print on fabric/paper.

“I use Inklingo to print templates on card stock for English Paper Piecing. It allows me to save money over purchasing die cuts.”  Dawn in Ontario, Canada

“Tried to do Patchwork of the Crosses the traditional way but as I have arthritis in my fingers I found sewing with the templates too hard. Looked on your website, purchased Inklingo and a new printer and am enjoying sewing by hand again. I just love the ease of use and have told all my friends to give it a try.”  Carolyn in NSW Australia

There is an excellent article on Kerry’s blog about why she switched from EPP to Inklingo.

Dawn says: Inklingo is so versatile, I think every EPP’er should try it.

Quilters Like You

Quilters Like You have been making POTC blocks with Inklingo since 2009.

You can see MANY examples of POTC quilts and blocks on Pinterest. Search for POTC, Patchwork of the Crosses, Lucy Boston, Crosses quilt, etc.

Kathy Timmons POTC

You can see many of Kathy’s fussy cut POTC blocks in an album on Flickr. She has been an Inklingo quilter from the very beginning in 2006.

Fern in Singapore made a gorgeous replica of Lucy Boston’s quilt. You can see many of her blocks on the All About Inklingo blog.

POTC by Fern in Singapore

POTC is a wonderful quilt to make. I enjoyed piecing it so much. Many of my blocks were completely machine pieced. Just pin carefully, keep your machine stitches small and sew cross-hair to cross-hair. Inklingo makes this so easy. I finished my POTC quilt in record time by machine piecing many of my blocks. Some of my blocks were hand-pieced when I had to travel for work. Inklingo is also fabulous for hand-piecing. The lines are so accurate and clear. Much more accurate and faster than drawing with a template, and much faster to sew than EPP. Fern in Singapore

POTC by Zsuzsa in Hungary

Congratulations, Zsuzsa! Thank you for sharing your beautiful work with us.
Gratulálunk, Zsuzsa! Köszönjük, hogy megosztja velünk a szép munkát.

POTC sewn with a running stitch by Elaine in VIC Australia.

This is Elaine’s first hand piecing project! She has made some wonderful fabric choices. POTC is not just for quilters who enjoy English Paper Piecing!

You can see more of Elaine’s fussy cut POTC blocks on the Inklingo Facebook page. (You don’t have to have a FB account.)

7 reviews for 1 inch Hexagons 90° (POTC)

  1. Fern (verified owner)

    i attempted and abandoned Lucy Boston’s quilt some 12 years ago. Inklingo makes it easy-peasy to make an complex, exquisite and magnificent quilt. I am having so much fun with mine now. Thank you.

  2. Erin (verified owner)

    My mother’s cat has to sleep in the middle of my blocks whenever I work on this at her house. I’m thinking of renaming this one “Patchwork of the Cat.” This is another quilt I probably wouldn’t have attempted without Inklingo. The ability to print cutting and stitching lines on all the background shapes and most of my coordinating fabrics has been a time saver! You can see some of my blocks here: http://aprairiehome.com/patchwork-of-the-crosses/

  3. Jeannette (verified owner)

    How do you spell splendid? I think “Inklingo” and “Power of the Cross” says it all to me. I even broke down and bought some fat quarters that will fussy cut stunningly for this project. And it’s almost too easy to hand sew with Inklingo.

  4. Joan F (verified owner)

    This pattern goes together in so many different ways. Fussy cutting and pattern repeats can make the block pop. Inklingo is a great tool for it.

  5. Nancy (verified owner)

    Continuation. All of the Inklingo collections that I have used are of the highest quality. Thank you Linda and Monkey!

  6. Joan (verified owner)

    Maryam has said it all 🙂 This is just the best design to work with and so very addictive. I have a over 70 blocks done for a King size quilt …and am currently putting them all together…. . I would NEVER had attempted this quilt, or made it the size I have, if it hadn’t been for Linda’s wonderful Inklingo. All the peices really go together so well, and fit together with perfection.

  7. Maryam (verified owner)

    Inklingo is by far the best and easiest way to work with this shape. The cutting and sewing lines on the back of the fabric make it perfect each and every time. I never dreamed something so complicated and difficult looking could be achieved so effortlessly!

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